7 WAYS TO KNOW IF YOUR VAGINAL DISCHARGE IS DANGEROUS AND HOW TO PREVENT IT FROM DESTROYING YOUR FALLOPIAN TUBES

7 WAYS TO KNOW IF YOUR VAGINAL DISCHARGE IS DANGEROUS AND HOW TO PREVENT IT FROM DESTROYING YOUR FALLOPIAN TUBES

PROBLEMS OF VAGINAL DISCHARGE 
Ladies, must pay attention to this advice, especially if you wish to become pregnant someday. Pay attention to any possible vaginal infection you may have. I know, this is something we do not want to discuss. If the symptoms are not too severe, we put it down to a possible yeast infection and wait it out, praying it will quickly cure itself. In the process, we may use some over the counter remedies. But what we should be doing is seeing a doctor.Why? Infections in the vaginal region can be serious. They can lead to long term problems such as infertility issues later in life. They can make it difficult to become pregnant and they may cause complications to occur once you do become pregnant. They can even signal that you are infected with a possible STD (sexually transmitted disease).



A discharge is a fluid released from a hollow space like the vagina. The
vagina is a tube 8-12 cm long. It opens at the lips of the vulva and is closed
at the inner end by the cervix (the opening of the uterus or womb). Wetness in
the vagina is produced by mucus from the cervix and from the vaginal wall
during sexual arousal. Many different bacteria, yeasts and parasites
(microscopic forms of life or ‘bugs’) live normally in the vagina without causing
symptoms. The vagina is usually acidic because the normal bacteria produce
lactic acid. Normal bacteria help the vagina protect itself from the kinds of
bacteria that cause disease. Candida (yeast) can live in the vagina in low
numbers without causing any symptoms.
Vaginal discharge [or Discharge from the vagina] refers to secretions from the vagina . Such discharge can vary in:
[A]Consistency (thick, pasty, thin)
[B]Color (clear, cloudy)
[C]Smell (normal, odorless, bad odor)

Having some amount of vaginal discharge is normal, especially if you are of childbearing age. Glands in the cervix produce a clear mucus. These secretions may turn white or yellow when exposed to the air. These are normal variations.
The amount of mucus produced by the cervical glands varies throughout the menstrual cycle. This is normal and depends on the amount of estrogen circulating in your body. It is also normal for the walls of the vagina to release some secretions. The amount depends on hormone levels in the body.
Vaginal discharge that suddenly differs in color, odor, or consistency, or significantly increases or decreases in amount, may indicate an underlying problem like an infection.



CAUSES
The following situations can increase the amount of normal vaginal discharge:
[1]Emotional stress
[2]Ovulation (the production and release of an egg from your ovary in the middle of your menstrual cycle)
[3]Pregnancy
[4]Sexual excitement


ABNORMAL VAGINAL DISCHARGE
Unusual mucus or other substances coming from the vagina is a common problem. The discharge is often due to infection, and frequently associated with pain, burning, itching, and painful urination. Not all infections are sexually transmitted, so don’t assume that vaginal discharge means that you have an STD. There are a number of possible causes:
Inflammation of the vagina. Called vaginitis, this is the most common reason for discharges and is usually caused by infection. There are three main types of vaginal infections, all of which can be treated with oral or vaginal medications. Each infection tends to produce a distinct discharge:

[a]

Thick, white cottage cheese-like discharge, itching, irritated skin—yeast infection, or candidiasis. Women with diabetes and those taking antibiotics are more likely to develop this type of infection. Most women will have at least one yeast infection at some point in their lives.

[b]

Thin, yellow, foul-smelling discharge—Trichomonas, which is usually transmitted sexually.

[c]

Thin, gray or white, foul-smelling discharge—bacterial vaginosis.

[d]

Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID). Frequently caused by STDs that infect the cervix, uterus, ovaries, or fallopian tubes, this is the most common and serious complication of an STD and occurs in 1 million women every year. Symptoms include vaginal discharge or bleeding, lower abdominal pain, and fever. Chronic PID can result from one or more infections. The most common identifiable causes are gonorrhea or chlamydia, both of which are sexually transmitted. About 20 percent of women with PID become infertile.

[e]

Genital herpes. This infection can produce vaginal discharge if it affects the cervix. The first episode of genital herpes also features fever, itching, headache, and general muscle aches.

[f]

Infection of the inside of the uterus. This condition, known as endometritis, is usually caused by STDs, fibroid tumors, cancer, giving birth, or intrauterine devices (IUDs).

[g]

Inflammation of the vagina due to lack of estrogen. As a woman enters menopause, her body produces increasingly erratic amounts of estrogen. This often causes the vagina to dry out and become irritated. The condition is known as atrophic vaginitis and is treatable by estrogen replacement therapy, vaginal creams, and vaginal suppositories.

[h]

Other, less common causes of vaginal discharge include pregnancy, genital warts, cancer, and foreign objects in the vagina, such as a tampon that could not be removed.

Your doctor will ask you about the type of discharge and whether it occurs immediately before, after, or during menstruation or sexual activity. You should also expect to undergo a pelvic exam.

Normal discharge doesn’t smell, and does not cause any irritation or itching.
A discharge is likely to be abnormal if:
[1] it smells fishy
[2] it’s thick and white, like cottage cheese
[3] it’s greenish and smells foul
[4] there’s blood in it (except when you have a period)
[5] it’s itchy
[6] you have any genital sores or ulcers
[7] you have abdominal pain or pain on intercourse
[8] it started soon after you had unprotected sex with someone you suspect could have a sexually transmitted disease.



POSSIBLE CAUSES
[1]Bacterial vaginosis — Bacteria that normally live in the vagina overgrow, causing a grey discharge and fishy odor that worsen after sexual intercourse. Bacterial Vaginosis is usually not sexually transmitted.
[2]Cervical or vaginal cancer (rarely a cause of excess discharge)
[3]Chlamydia

[4]Forgotten tampon or foreign body
[5]Gonorrhea
[6]Other infections and sexually transmitted diseases
[7]Trichomoniasis
[8]Vaginal yeast infection


PREVENTION
[1]Keep your genital area clean and dry.
[2]Avoid douching. While many women feel cleaner if they douche after menstruation or intercourse, it may actually worsen vaginal discharge because it removes healthy bacteria lining



JOAS MEDICAL DIAGNOSTIX, Ikotun Lagos Nigeria, offer comprehensive infertility screening tests for both couples like Transvaginal Scan for uterine and ovarian functions,Ovulation/follicular tracking, HSG to evaluate the fallopian tubes, blood tests for hormone check, semen analysis etc. We also offer a simple assisted reproductive procedure like INTRAUTERINE INSEMINATION [IUI]. For accurate assessment of your fertility situation, contact us at JOAS MEDICAL DIAGNOSTIX, Ikotun Lagos Nigeria.


For FREE Consultation and FREE Counseling. Also for Quality and Accurate Medical Diagnostic Tests Contact JOAS MEDICAL DIAGNOSTIX
JOAS MEDICAL DIAGNOSTIX——-WE ARE AN ULTRAMODERN MEDICAL IMAGING CENTER. WE ARE EXPERTS IN ULTRASOUND SCAN SERVICES, 3D/4D COLOUR DOPPLER SCAN SERVICES, X-RAY/RADIOLOGY SERVICES, ECG SERVICES, INFERTILITY SERVICES, HSG SERVICES, LABORATORY SERVICES,BLOOD BANKING SERVICES , DNA SERVICES, AND HEALTH CONSULTANCY/COUNSELLING SERVICES.


We are located at
JOAS HOUSE, 2, Okesuna Street, Opposite The Synagogue Church Busstop, Bolorunpelu, Ikotun, Lagos Postcode: 100265 Nigeria.  
TEL: 08032509975, 08184590752, 08058166504, 08064981455

EMAIL: joasmedicaldiagnostix@yahoo.com joasmedicaldiagnostix@gmail.com


DISCLAIMER The contents, blogs and postings provided in this site are offered strictly for informational purposes only and should not be construed as legal, medical nor financial advice on any matter. We have made every effort to ensure the accuracy of the information presented, and if you have any questions regarding the contents please contact us. The informations provided in this site is subject to change without notice. This site may contain links to other internet sites, we are not responsible for the privacy, practices nor the content of such sites, nor their relationships

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.